Library Link of the Day

September 2019

<< August 2018 | October 2019 >>

  1. Misinformation Has Created a New World Disorder [Scientific American]
  2. Can Taylor Swift really rerecord her entire music catalogue? [The Washington Post]
  3. How googly eyes solved one of today’s trickiest UX problems [Fast Company]
  4. ‘China is not paying for it’: Trump tariff hike hits everyone from beer brewers to book publishers [CNBC]
  5. Serendipity, Tactility, and Community Library Research as a Practice of Wonder [Choice]
  6. Nashville school bans "Harry Potter" series, citing risk of "conjuring evil spirits" [CBS News]
  7. Challenged but not dying, the public libraries are more relevant than ever [Jutland Station]
  8. The Decline of Online Piracy: How Markets – Not Enforcement – Drive Down Copyright Infringement [American University International Law Review]
  9. Automatic for the People [American Libraries]
  10. Why It Matters That Amazon Shipped Margaret Atwood’s “The Testaments” a Week Early [Electric Literature]
  11. How an AI archive platform is helping a Victorian library keep up with data [ZDNet]
  12. Why are Books That Shape? From Codices to Kindles, Why This Rectangle Stays Golden [Book Riot]
  13. 48 States Investigating Whether Google's Dominance Hurts Competition [All Things Considered]
  14. How deepfakes undermine truth and threaten democracy [Danielle Citron]
  15. Chicago’s New Tool Library Is Awesome, Exactly What It Sounds Like [InsideHook]
  16. Libraries and Archivists Are Scanning and Uploading Books That Are Secretly in the Public Domain [Vice]
  17. The Discovery Dark Ages: How Filter Bubbles, Dark Patterns, and Algorithms Propagating Bias Impede the Spread of Knowledge [Medium]
  18. Raw Deal in Ebook Pricing [Online Searcher]
  19. How to make a book last for millennia [MIT News]
  20. Audible’s Caption Controversy [Locus Online]
  21. 'Canine library' offers chance to check out therapy dogs [CBC News]
  22. Steal This Book? There’s a Price [The New York Times]

These links are not updated for accuracy; older links may be dead.

This service is run by John Hubbard (write to me).
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