Library Link of the Day

March 2019

<< February 2018 | April 2019 >>

  1. The end of Blu-ray [ZDNet]
  2. Itís cool to spool again as the cassette returns on a wave of nostalgia [The Guardian]
  3. U. of California System Cancels Elsevier Subscriptions, Calling Move a Win for Open Access [The Chronicle of Higher Education]
  4. New York Cityís Secret (Tiny) Subway [Now I Know]
  5. The Guardians of the French Language Are Deadlocked, Just Like Their Country [The New York Times]
  6. Automation [Last Week Tonight]
  7. Blockchain Reaction [American Libraries]
  8. Delete Never: The Digital Hoarders Who Collect Tumblrs, Medieval Manuscripts, and Terabytes of Text Files [Gizmodo]
  9. Nearly one-in-five Americans now listen to audiobooks [Pew Research Center]
  10. Second Judge Blocks Trump Administration's Census Citizenship Question Plans [NPR]
  11. The high cost of college textbooks, explained [Vox]
  12. Turnitin to Be Acquired by Advance Publications for $1.75B [EdSurge]
  13. Why hospitals shouldnít use telepresence robots to deliver devastating news [The Verge]
  14. Lawsuit alleging Colorado libraries pushed porn is dismissed [EdSurge]
  15. 'I can get any novel I want in 30 seconds': can book piracy be stopped? [The Guardian]
  16. The Library of Congress wants to attract more visitors. Will that undermine its mission? [The Washington Post]
  17. Americaís doctors warn Google, Twitter, and Facebook: Anti-vaxxers are weaponizing tech platforms, prompting outbreaks that can 'debilitate and kill' [Business Insider]
  18. Norwegian Universities Ditch Elsevier [Inside Higher Ed]
  19. Itís Not Such A Small World After All [American Libraries]
  20. YouTube's Chief Product Officer On How The Company Responded To Mosque Shootings [All Things Considered]
  21. Battle of Supremes: How 'legal fakes' are challenging a $1B brand [CNN]
  22. Harvard Profits From Photos Of Slaves, Lawsuit Claims [NPR]
  23. The Quest to Acquire the Oldest, Most Expensive Book on the Planet [Literary Hub]

These links are not updated for accuracy; older links may be dead.

This service is run by John Hubbard (write to me).
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