Library Link of the Day

March 2014

<< February 2014 | April 2014 >>

  1. The Oxford English Dictionary Wants YOU! [Slate]
  2. Why Israel gave Japan 300 Anne Frank-related books [The Denver Post]
  3. On Extremists [Library Journal]
  4. Recession's over: Why aren't public services coming back? [Los Angeles Times]
  5. This Human of New York Takes His Libraries Seriously [The Atlantic]
  6. Textbooks replaced by iTunes U downloads [BBC News]
  7. Freedom to Read and Reconsider at the Toronto Public Library [Torontoist]
  8. Not So Fast: Speed-Reading App Fails To Convince Experts [NBC News]
  9. Comics Artist Burns Books He Made With $50k in Kickstarter Funding [GalleyCat]
  10. Libraries, Authors and Publishers Head to SXSW 2014 [Publishers Weekly]
  11. Anne Rice signs petition to protest bullying of authors on Amazon [The Guardian]
  12. England 'divided into readers and watchers' [BBC News]
  13. Beyond eBooks [Inside Higher Ed]
  14. Pew: The Library Holds Its Own in the Information Age [Re/code]
  15. Google's Flu Tracker Suffers From Sniffles [Morning Edition]
  16. The allure of an old-fashioned pen pal [BBC News]
  17. The problem with too much information [Aeon]
  18. Harvard's Hiring a Wikipedian-in-Residence [Gizmodo]
  19. The Future of Books Looks a Lot Like Netflix [Wired]
  20. If libraries can't make it here in New York, can they make it anywhere? [The Guardian]
  21. Plan To Close University of Pennsylvania Departmental Libraries Meets Resistance [Library Journal]
  22. The disappearing tribe of India's letter writers [BBC News]
  23. Google And Viacom Finally Settle The Big YouTube Lawsuit [Techdirt]
  24. Why Are So Few Books From the 20th Century Available as Ebooks? [The Atlantic]
  25. How do you DRM a coffee pod? [Ars Technica]
  26. Academics Write Papers Arguing Over How Many People Read (And Cite) Their Papers [Smithsonian]
  27. I Sold My Undergraduate Thesis to a Print Content Farm [Slate]
  28. An Inkling for Ink [Now I Know]
  29. How Can Bookstores Stay Alive? [The New York Times]
  30. College textbook startup heads to 'Shark Tank' [USA Today]
  31. Poet laureate leads protest against prison book rules [BBC News]

These links are not updated for accuracy; older links may be dead.

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