Library Link of the Day

September 2010

<< August 2010 | October 2010 >>

  1. Doctors Heed Call for Books for Afghanistan [The New York Times]
  2. Google’s Earth [The New York Times]
  3. Dizzied by Data [The Chronicle of Higher Education]
  4. Author to Bypass Publisher for Fans [The Wall Street Journal]
  5. Cover story [The Boston Globe]
  6. Of Two Minds About Books [The New York Times]
  7. Will the Book Survive Generation Text? [The Chronicle of Higher Education]
  8. Fending off the digital dark ages: The archival storage issue [Computerworld]
  9. Is burning Quran a hate crime or a free speech issue? [USA Today]
  10. Librarian Sues Over Porn in Her Workplace [ABC News]
  11. The World's Worst Textbooks [Foreign Policy]
  12. Peer review highly sensitive to poor refereeing, claim researchers [physicsworld.com]
  13. Sony’s new eBook readers: first-look review [PC Pro]
  14. How good software makes us stupid [BBC News]
  15. World's most expensive book goes up for sale [BBC News]
  16. At Main Library in Kansas City, KS, DVD Circulation Nears 60% [Library Journal]
  17. How To Sell A Book? Good Old Word Of Mouth [Morning Edition]
  18. Learning by Playing: Video Games in the Classroom [The New York Times]
  19. A Truly Bookless Library [Inside Higher Ed]
  20. The E-Textbook Experiment Turns A Page [All Things Considered]
  21. What’s in a Label [Intellectual Property Brief]
  22. Palm Beach County, cities building new libraries even as budget woes force cutbacks [South Florida Sun-Sentinel]
  23. Copying Is Not Theft [Nina Paley]
  24. College Libraries Save Money By Ignoring Netflix Terms Of Use [The Consumerist]
  25. Blockbuster bankrupt, but small video stores thrive [The Christian Science Monitor]
  26. New books jump off the page with digital enhancements [USA Today]
  27. Opinion: There is a time to ban books from school libraries [Yahoo! News]
  28. Anger as a Private Company Takes Over Libraries [The New York Times]
  29. Is this the final chapter for paper books? [The Sydney Morning Herald]
  30. In Study, Children Cite Appeal of Digital Reading [The New York Times]

These links are not updated for accuracy; older links may be dead.

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