Library Link of the Day

June 2009

<< May 2009 | July 2009 >>

  1. Summer reading: How parents can keep kids on track for successful learning [TwinCities.com]
  2. Preparing to Sell E-Books, Google Takes on Amazon [The New York Times]
  3. Layoffs turn parents into school librarians [Times Press Recorder]
  4. Search is too important to leave to one company – even Google [Guardian]
  5. Energy Chief Says Nuclear Disclosure 'of Great Concern' [The Wall Street Journal]
  6. The Censors Right Here at Home [Newsweek]
  7. Call it Gutenberg 2.0 [The Boston Globe]
  8. Rangeview Library District, CO, First System To Fully Drop Dewey [Library Journal]
  9. Authors ready to throw the book at online pirates [The Sydney Morning Herald]
  10. Library board rejects restrictions [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel]
  11. Online push in California schools [BBC News]
  12. Amazon Kindle DX [CNET Reviews]
  13. Hate speech or free speech? What much of West bans is protected in U.S. [The New York Times]
  14. As US gov’t circles the wagons, Google’s brass stays cool [The Christian Science Monitor]
  15. Reading Dickens Four Ways [The Chronicle of Higher Education]
  16. Job seekers turn to the library [The Baltimore Sun]
  17. Booking the future [openDemocracy]
  18. This Revolution Will be televised [The Huffington Post]
  19. Economists List File Sharing's Benefits [InformationWeek]
  20. How Twitter can make history [TED]
  21. Librarians Fighting Google's Book Deal [Time]
  22. The Newspaper Isn't Dead Yet [Slate]
  23. A Literary Legend Fights for a Local Library [The New York Times]
  24. Elsevier Won't Pay for Praise [Inside Higher Ed]
  25. Advocates blast Ohio Gov.'s proposed budget cuts [Forbes]
  26. What will the literary archives of today's authors look like? [Guardian]
  27. Winning Teams Join to Qualify for $1 Million Netflix Prize [Wired]
  28. Penguin publishers using online social networking to attract teen readers [examiner.com]
  29. Frugal readers drive up library circulation 30% [Chicago Sun-Times]
  30. The perils of five-star reviews [BBC News]

These links are not updated for accuracy; older links may be dead.

This service is run by John Hubbard (write to me).
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Armored knights raising their visors has evolved into the modern military salute.